BeyondKommonSense
hiiipowerh3:

cruelladetrillaa:

Haitian woman defending her son in the Dominican Republic.

This picture is raw

hiiipowerh3:

cruelladetrillaa:

Haitian woman defending her son in the Dominican Republic.

This picture is raw

I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life. I’ve learned that making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life.” I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back. I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
Maya Angelou (via getyourassbeat)

bigtittielover:

"she dancing like she fucking"

opnupandsayahh:

nude-celebz:

Sharon Stone GIF the scene that made her famous.

never forgot this!!

opnupandsayahh:

nude-celebz:

Sharon Stone GIF the scene that made her famous.


never forgot this!!

littledidiknow:

latimes:

The story behind Sriracha

With a distinctive bottle taste, Sriracha has gone from an unpronounceable challenge to a staple sauce for many Americans. In the U.S. alone, $60 million worth of the sauce was sold last year alone.

But it wasn’t always such a prevalent item on store shelves. David Tran, the man responsible for popularizing the hot sauce, had a long journey beforehand:

When North Vietnam’s communists took power in South Vietnam, Tran, a major in the South Vietnamese army, fled with his family to the U.S. After settling in Los Angeles, Tran couldn’t find a job — or a hot sauce to his liking.

So he made his own by hand in a bucket, bottled it and drove it to customers in a van. He named his company Huy Fong Foods after the Taiwanese freighter that carried him out of Vietnam.

Read more via our profile of Tran, and his beloved hot sauce.

Photos: Gina Ferazzi, Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times

Has never spent $1 on advertising.

thickarabgirls:

Sexy big eyes and hot big hips